Malawi situated in the heart of Africa at the southern end of East Africa’s Rift Valley with a diversity of attractions that is its greatest assets.

A former British colony, a combination of stunning landscapes; fascinating wildlife, appealing Lake Malawi, and rich culture that unites, makes this small country continue to attract magnitudes of tourists throughout the year.

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Cultural / People

The people of Malawi are Bantu meaning, member of any of several peoples forming a linguistically and in some respects culturally interrelated family in central and southern Africa origin and comprise of many different ethnic groups. Those located in Malawi comprise Chewa, Nyanja, Yao, Tumbuka, Lhomwe, Sena, Tonga, Ngoni, Ngonde, Asian and European. In majority are the Chichewa (Chewa) people forming the largest part of the populace, largely settled in central and southern parts of the country.

The country divided into regions, northern, central, and southern. Dotted with a number of particular cultural places and historical interest such as Kumbali cultural village in Lilongwe, Kungoni in Dedza, Chongoni Rock-Art in Dedza and all travel will include some elements of cultural experience a true reflection of interaction with locals is very much part of any stay.

Having said that, it takes us to our next point.

More Lake Malawi Photos

Lake

Its giant, freshwater snorkeling running from the northern part to southern-end and diving in clear water lake is its given natural treasurer. The sunny beaches alongside Lake Malawi are golden, and the waters are nearly empty except for a few fishermen boats.

Lake Malawi, its home to largest number of fish species of any lake in the world, quick on minds of Malawians being Chambo fish. Bordering with Tanzania to the north and Mozambique southwest, the lake extends more than six hundred kilometers from north to south, is up to eighty kilometers wide and in some sections is over seven hundred meters deep.

Surrounded by beaches of golden sand is not merely a scenic wonderland but it provides water sport opening for those in search of something beyond sand, swimming, and sunshine.

The lake draws in a variety of bird species, as well as hippos, baboons and warthogs, occasional elephants. Not bad company to enjoy the water with (well, maybe not the hippos). 

This brings us to our third point. 

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Wildlife / Safari

Malawi the landlocked country is blessed with wide range of flora and fauna and has no less than nine national parks and wildlife reserves across the country. Major one being: Mwabvi Wildlife Reserve, Lengwe National Park, Vwaza Marsh Game Reserve, Kasungu National Park, Lake Malawi National Park, Liwonde national park, Nyika national park and Majete Wildlife Reserve.

Whilst it may not have quite the sheer numbers of large mammals (particularly predators) as some of its better-known neighbors like Zambia and Tanzania, it makes up for this in other ways. Malawi provides intensive and exclusive wildlife viewing in unspoiled areas of genuine wilderness. 

Repopulation wildlife and Rehabilitation game reserves

A number of travel agencies with their main offices in towns offers eco-friendly trips mountain biking, horseback riding and traditional housing stay, safaris in parks and reserves at affordable rates.

Most notable ones and the best parks are Majete Wildlife Reserve and Nyika National Park, which became targets for poaching that continued into the 1990s. By the 2000s, Malawi government privatized ownership, a partnership with non-profit organization, which repopulated the park and rehabilitated.

The Big Five (elephant, rhino, lion, leopard, buffalo) can be viewed here.

Peaceful vibe

Malawi, land of peace with fewer traffic jams and hassles of city life. A country largely rural made, comprised of 15.7% population living urban regions. 

Rift Valley

Lake Malawi consumes a large chunk of a rift valley that extends to the south of the country following the Shire River that drains the Lake. The flatter areas of the Rift Valley in southern Malawi are home to Elephant Marsh and Lower Shire Valley including some important wetlands.

More Accomodation Photos

Accommodation

When traveling in Malawi, you can be certain of finding or sleep in more budget accommodations throughout the day even odd night hours. Best accommodations sites are: Safari cottage, Nkwichi Lodge, Makuzi beach, Luwawa forest lodge, Kande horse, Chintheche Inn, Chelinda lodge camp.

The locals are friendly

Fondly known as the “Warm Heart of Africa,” in the native language, Malawi locals exude friendliness. It’s common for strangers to wave and greet visitors as if they know them.

And it’s easy to make them smile with a “moni” (pronounced mo-nee, not money), which means hello in Chichewa, the local language, and “Zikomo” (thank you).

Curious kids often come by to say hi and see what you’re up to. The refrain I heard repeatedly was, “Welcome. You are welcome.”

Although overt friendliness often arouses suspicion in the world traveler, especially when someone’s trying to sell you stuff you don’t want, there’s hardly any hawking or selling of tacky souvenirs in Malawi — the people are genuinely friendly.

Founded in 1964, Malawi has never had a civil war.

More Landscape & Scenic Photos

Landscape / Scenic

With enormous beautiful landscapes and sceneries. Highest peaks touch 10 000ft (3 000m) lowest point sitting above sea level. These ranges of altitudes in a small area help to make the landscape of Malawi one of the most varied in all southern end of East Africa’s Rift Valley. It is generally evergreen-year-in-year-out, with the plateau, highlands, forests, mountains, plains, escarpments and dramatic river valleys providing fresh air.

The mixture of scenery is a great attraction to tourists in additional of the highland areas and forest reserves providing good accommodation options and plenty of outdoor activities.

The southern region of Malawi has the best-known highlands – Mulanje Massif and Zomba Plateau. With a number of peaks, plus the highest in the country and the whole of central Africa Sapitwa in Mulanje, stands at 3000 meters (10,000 feet).

Magnificent tea estates that stretch from Thyolo to Mulanje – Muloza a bordering district with Mozambique is another wonderfully scenic. Not as high as Mulanje Mountain, Zomba plateau is gently undulating top which is accessible by road.

The Dedza-Kirk Highlands is another must visit. It extends the rise from the Rift Valley on its western edge between Blantyre and Lilongwe.

Dedza, Thuma and Salima Forest Reserve situated in the northern part of these highlands is marked by the Dedza-Salima Forest Reserve covers a range of hills at the border with Mozambique. The Dowa Highlands north of Lilongwe have their most notable peaks at Dowa and Ntchisi Forest Reserve.

The northern part of Malawi has Nyika Plateau, a rolling whaleback grassland plateau unique in Africa. Much of this highest and most extensive high plateau surface in central Africa is archived as the Nyika National Park.

Eat & Drink

The promise of a good breakfast, lunch and supper is often the clinching factor when deciding where to book for accommodation as a tourist- and quite right too, as going the extra mile with breakfast tells you a great deal about a place and the way it is run.

For breakfast most of tourists takes Malawian tea or locally made juices with bread. For lunch its chips, eggs, and chicken. As for supper, it rice with beef stew together with local vegetables. At the bar most tourists takes Carlsberg green or Malawi Gin.

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